The Whole30® Program – What You Need To Know

The Whole30® Program – What You Need To Know

Every diet plan – including the Mediterranean diet, the DASH diet  and the ketogenic diet – work on the principle of modifying the portion of certain foods or food groups consumed on a daily basis, as well as eliminating certain types of food entirely. Now, the Whole30 diet program is sweeping the nation as not just a weight loss program (it pointedly does not use the word “diet”), but a supportive community of devotees dedicated to achieving and maintaining a truly transformative quality of life experience.

natural diet, losing belly fatDeveloped by co-founders Melissa Hartwig and Dallas Hartwig in 2009, Whole30 is designed to change the way you eat and feel in 30 days. The website describes the program as “… a short-term nutrition reset, designed to help you put an end to unhealthy cravings and habits, restore a healthy metabolism, heal your digestive tract, and balance your immune system.”

While that sounds like a pretty tall order, Whole30 achieves all of this and more by explicitly targeting the individual’s emotional and habitual relationship with food. The program revolves around breaking unhealthy behavioral patterns, putting a full-stop to stress-related comfort eating, and reducing carbohydrate and sugar cravings. Many people on the Whole30 program report having achieved food freedom within the 30-day period.

The purpose is to understand how your body responds to some foods. You eliminate these foods completely and then gradually reinstate them after 30 days. If you think these foods still work well for you, fine, and in case you find something that helps your body feel good, that’s even better!

 

The foods on the Whole30 program

Whole30 doesn’t ask you to leave your favorite foods forever. You are only asked to abstain from eating some foods and beverages for 30 days, and then slowly reinstate them. As mentioned earlier, the aim is to understand how your body responds to some foods.


Here is a partial list of permitted foods:

fruits, vegetables, healthy food, healthy life style

 

  • Vegetables – Eat as many as you want.
  • Fruits –Allowed in moderation, due to limits on sugar intake.
  • Seafood – Allowed, including shellfish.
  • Unprocessed meats – Make sure they don’t contain added sugar or preservatives.
  • Eggs – No limit.
  • Nuts and seeds – Allowed, except for peanuts (which is a legume, rather than a tree nut).
  • Coffee – Allowed, but only without milk products or sugar.
  • Oils and ghee – Olive and coconut oil are allowed, as well as ghee (clarified butter).

 


 

Following is a partial list of foods to avoid during the 30-day program:

dairy products, healthy lifestyle, diet,

  • Dairy products – Includes cheese, butter (except for ghee), yogurt, cow’s milk, kefir and cream (sour or otherwise).
  • Legumes – No members of this family, including soy (soy sauce, tofu, edamame or miso), peas, chickpeas, peanuts and lentils.
  • Grains – Includes wheat, corn, quinoa, sprouted grains, millet, rye, bulgur, buckwheat, amaranth and sorghum.
  • Alcohol – Abstain completely during the 30-day period, including using alcohol for cooking. Vanilla extract is also on the forbidden list.
  • Added sugar in all forms – including artificial sweetener – This includes sugar in natural forms, such as maple or agave syrup. Check the label when shopping, as many items include some type or amount of sugar.
  • Junk food – Almost needless to say. No baked goods, snack foods, ice cream, etc.
  • MSG, sulfites and carrageenan – Common additives in processed foods. Carrageenan is a common additive in natural foods, and has been implicated in digestive system conditions.

 


The Whole30 community and forum

As mentioned earlier, Whole30 provides plenty of support and encouragement for those following the program. The Whole30 Forum is designed to help navigate the Whole30 program, ask questions and seek advice from the program’s experts. Those who have been through the program can share their success stories and provide motivation for others.  

From features, updates and news from the Whole30 team to rules, regulations, recipes and books, you have everything on the Whole30 Forum that you wish to know and ask. There is something for everyone on the Forum – how to follow Whole30 with a medical condition, Whole30 for athletes and Whole30 while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Interacting with others sharing the Whole30 experience creates a community feeling, which greatly helps boost motivation. The Whole30 Community is like a close-knit family where you can get answers to questions, as well as track your meals, progress and results – and even share your recipes and success stories.

If the Whole30 program has had a positive effect on your life, you can become a certified Whole30 coach and help others by offering your resources and services to your local community.

We at Solutions Weight Loss encourage everyone to follow a healthy lifestyle by whatever means achieves the best result for each individual. If you’ve tried other programs and diets but feel that a medically supervised weight loss program may be what you need to achieve long-term results, contact us to schedule an appointment with Dr. William E. Newsome and learn about your options.

What is The Mediterranean Diet and Would It Work For You?

What is The Mediterranean Diet and Would It Work For You?

Diet trends come and go faster than we can start them, but that does not hinder our curiosity. Consistently, they are chalked up to eliminating food groups or a restrictive food intake, setting us up for a mid-diet burnout or dangerous eating habits. Although some plans may achieve the desired results, they are often short-lived and lack practical healthy lifestyle choices. If you are ready to give yet another diet a go, we are happy to present our Mediterranean diet 101.

Consisting of well-balanced and relatively non-restrictive foods, the tried-and-true Mediterranean diet sets you up for a healthier, extended future. It focuses on the type of fats you eat, rather than how much. Online nutrition program, Real Living Nutrition Services, breaks down the difference between the three main fats found in our food. Along the way, you will learn about what food contains and how it has an impact on your overall health. As one of the few diets that will leave you both happy and healthy, it may be the right plan for you.

What is the Mediterranean Diet?

The Mediterranean diet encapsulates the traditional cooking style of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea in the 1960s. But why should you try the Mediterranean diet over other plans? To start, it was not developed in a lab, but evolved over 5,000 years based on a natural way of living. While the diet consists of a few basic rules, the meals created can be adapted to any local and seasonal food availability. 

 

Elena Paravantes a Greek-American Registered Dietitian, founder of OliveTomato, and Culinary Nutritionist specializing in the Mediterranean Diet, explains that, “the diet is characterized by a high intake of vegetables and olive oil, moderate amounts of carbohydrates, and small amounts of meat.”

 

Equally important, it is not just a weight loss plan, but promotes healthy living. The Mayo Clinic calls the diet “heart-healthy”, as it is associated with lower levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol, thereby reducing your chance of heart disease. It is also said to reduce the chance of diabetes, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. For these reasons, most major scientific organizations encourage healthy adults to adapt a similar diet. Notably, the base of the Mediterranean diet food pyramid consists of physical activity and interactive mealtimes. The Mediterranean lifestyle considers this aspect important, as it encourages healthy socialization.

Mediterranean Diet Meals

So what areas of your diet will change? Like the DASH Diet and Ketogenic Diet, it begins with a set calorie goal. A typical Mediterranean diet will range between 1,200 to 1,500 calories daily. This list will inform you about what you should and should not consume, as well as the recommended daily servings.

Meat and seafood The ‘bad’ cholesterol previously mentioned is due to saturated fats ‒ which are the highest in red meat. The Mediterranean diet replaces meat with plant-based foods, although red meat can be enjoyed a few times a month. Eggs and poultry are better than red meat, but only in moderation. Instead, fresh fish or seafood is recommended up to twice a week, cooked in olive or canola oil.

Fruits and vegetables – As the base of every meal, an average of nine servings of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables should be consumed every day. At least one meal a day should include a salad or other leafy greens, so get your kale on! Other fruits and vegetable servings can include olives, figs, cherries, dates, tomatoes, grapes and melons, among others.

Grains – Unlike most diets, and a relief to many, bread is a staple in every Mediterranean meal. The only stipulation is that they are whole-grain. These contain tons of vitamins, minerals and healthy fats. Other grains and pasta are also regularly featured, from five to six servings a day. Whether it is dipped, smeared, or twirled on a fork, enjoy your carbs!

Nuts and seeds A popular snack, raw nuts or seeds contain high doses of healthy fats, fiber and protein. You can have three to five one-ounce servings of raw nuts a week. The most popular are almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, pistachios, walnuts and sesame seeds. A fresh pesto or tahini is perfect for dipping whole-grain bread!

Dairy products – Approved dairy products are few and should be consumed in moderation. Try to stick to unprocessed and low-fat cheese and yogurt. For example, Greek yogurt, feta and Parmigiano-Reggiano. Other dairy products are eliminated, or can be replaced with olive oil, which is much more flavorful and rich in monounsaturated fats, omegas and antioxidants. Seven to 14 tablespoons is recommended weekly. 

Seasonings – One large hurdle for many to overcome is the use of salt. Often consumed with pastas and grains, large amounts of salt can increase your blood pressure, putting you at risk for heart attack, stroke, dementia and kidney disease. Instead, the Mediterranean diet utilizes fresh herbs and spices, which have a variety of health benefits.

Beverages If you have a hard time coping with a lack of your favorite dairy, take solace in the occasional glass of wine ‒ with your doctor’s approval. The Mediterranean diet allows up to five ounces of wine daily. Like any good diet, at least six glasses of water a day is recommended. If you want a little pick-me-up, a small unsweetened coffee or tea is fine.

Sweets Unfortunately, sweets have no place in a Mediterranean diet, including sweeteners. If you are craving something sweet, a fresh and juicy piece of fruit will keep you full. A large grapefruit, nectarine or apple can go a long way.

What is a mediterranean diet? would it work for you?

Conveniently, most Mediterranean meals require little preparation. For example, our easy Mediterranean omelet. Like all dishes, it contains the freshest ingredients and consists of a range of flavors. Many assume that Mediterranean meals are strictly Greek, but they include foods from many countries, such as Morocco, Spain and Turkey. Don’t be afraid to look further! If you have a hard time discovering dishes, Healthline offers a helpful example of a week’s worth of Mediterranean meals.

If you are still feeling uninspired, Dr. Newsome would love to assist you in your diet plan decision. Start your weight loss journey with the care and knowledge of a physician who understands the frustrations and challenges of weight loss. Contact us at Solutions Weight Loss, the preferred Orlando weight loss clinic.

Weight Loss and the DASH Diet – What You Need to Know

Weight Loss and the DASH Diet – What You Need to Know

Obesity has become an epidemic not just in the United States, but around the world. Many diet plans have been developed as a result, with varying rates of success. One diet program that is proving to be effective is DASH – Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. DASH was named as the best diet plan for the last eight years by U.S. News & World Report. Apart from hypertension (commonly known as high blood pressure), DASH is also known to fight diabetes, maintain heart health and help lower cholesterol levels.

Formulated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the DASH diet was initially developed for people who want to take control of their hypertension. But, the diet soon gained traction among dieters, who found it helped them lose weight more effectively. As is known to most who want to lose weight, several nutritional factors that affect blood pressure also influence weight – such as sugar, trans fats and processed foods in general.

What is the DASH diet and how does it work?

The DASH diet works on the principle of cutting down on sodium consumption. You are advised to primarily focus on eating vegetables, fruits, and dairy foods. As far as dairy is concerned, you should choose low-fat options because they have less added salt. You also need to have some fish, poultry, whole grains, and nuts.

The amount of salt you should have depends on the type of DASH diet you are on:

The standard DASH diet – allowed to have up to 2,300 mg of sodium daily.

The low-sodium DASH diet – allowed to have 1,500 mg of sodium daily.

Unlike many other high-profile diet plans, DASH does not squarely focus on eliminating starches. When it comes to losing weight, sustainability is the key. Therefore, for best results, you need to follow a diet plan and continue it for a long time. But the problem when you select a low-carb diet plan is that it becomes hard for you to keep carbs at bay over the long term. However, the DASH diet is more palatable, making compliance easier.

The only restrictions in case of the DASH diet are to avoid sugar, fats, processed foods and sodium. Saying no to processed foods can solve most of your sugar, fat, and sodium problem. The ultra-processed foods an average American consumes in a day contributes 58% of the total calories, 90% of added sugars and 75% of sodium.

There is no doubt that processed foods contain excess salt, which increases the risk of diseases like hypertension, stroke, and heart disease. Cutting down the intake of salt can substantially lower these risks. But, it is not just these diseases that are linked to a high sodium diet – there is a distinct connection between high blood pressure and weight that cannot be overlooked.

What can I eat?! What does a typical DASH diet include?

One of the first questions people ask before starting a diet, is… what can I eat?!  The Dairy Alliance and Registered dietitian Sarah-Jane Bedwell combined efforts on a video detailing some menu items that qualify for the DASH Diet.

For moderately active people ages 19 to 51, DASH requires a 2,000 calorie diet per day. This is what the DASH diet menu would read like:

Grains – The ideal scenario is to consume 6-8 servings of grains every day. You should have more of whole grains because they contain nutrients and fiber in abundance. Choose products that display 100% whole grain labels.

Vegetables – Followers of the DASH diet should have 4-5 servings of vegetables every day. Add vegetables such as broccoli, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and other leafy veggies to your diet, as they are rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber.

Fruits – You should have a minimum of 4-5 servings of fruit, as it raises your energy levels and increases the fiber content in your body. You can have fruits such as apples, pears and grapefruit because these are a rich source of fiber and antioxidants.

Meat, fish, and poultry – It is always good to have meat in moderation, and that is what the DASH diet recommends. Meat contains iron, protein, B-complex vitamins and zinc. Have 4-6 servings of lean, skinless meat daily.

Dairy products – Milk and other dairy products contain protein, calcium, and vitamin D in sufficient quantity. However, select low-fat/fat-free products. You should have a minimum of 2-3 servings of dairy daily. Substitute with lactose-free dairy products if you are allergic to milk.

Oils and fats – Fats are essential for the body, as they help absorb vitamins, which helps keep the immune system in balance. Limit your fats and oil intake to 2-3 servings daily. The DASH diet recommends limiting your daily consumption of fat to under 27% and saturated fats to 7% or less.

Nuts, seeds, peas and dry beans – You should have 4-5 servings of nuts, seeds and beans every week. Nuts don’t have a good reputation because they are high in fat, but if consumed as recommended in the DASH diet, they are beneficial, as nuts are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. You can have cashews, almonds, peas, sunflower seeds, pistachio, beans, and lentils, which are rich in fiber, potassium, and magnesium.

Sweets –You can have sweets, but in moderation – keeping it to five servings a week. If you consider low-fat treats – such as jelly beans, fruit ices, granola bars and low-fat cookies – be sure to read the label for their sugar content, which can be high.

A balanced diet like DASH is planned to keep you feeling full. You have sufficient fruits and vegetables that are rich in fiber and enough lean protein that makes you feel full most of the time. DASH also reduces calorie intake, which helps you lose weight quickly. When you feel satisfied with your food intake, instead of constantly hungry, you are more likely to increase your physical activity, which also helps weight loss.

As everyone is different, it is always advisable to follow a customized diet plan. Solutions Weight Loss offers effective, proven medically supervised weight loss programs that are tailored to each individual. Dr. Newsome and our entire team provide comprehensive support to every client in reaching their goal. Contact us today to learn more.

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