The Staying Power of the Atkins Diet

The Staying Power of the Atkins Diet

The Atkins diet is one of the most well-known and popular diets ‒ to the point that the Atkins name is an established brand that includes product lines of frozen food and meals, meal kits, treats, bars and those famous shakes. So how does it work, and what makes it different? We’ll look at how this groundbreaking diet got its staying power by producing sustainable results through healthy lifestyle changes.

What is the Atkins diet?

Now called the Atkins 20®, the original Atkins diet was introduced in 1972 by cardiologist Robert Atkins. The goal of Atkins is to learn your specific carbohydrate intake, and replace the amount of carbs that would cause you to gain weight with protein and healthy fats. With the increase of these ‘good’ foods, you will naturally feel fuller, leading to a reduction in appetite. Although highly recommended for weight loss, participants can also expect improved blood sugar, triglycerides, and (good) HDL cholesterol. Unlike most diets, it does not limit the amount of food you can eat ‒ only which types.

The four phases

The Atkins diet has four phases, created to jumpstart weight loss and introduce food restrictions.

  • Induction – Limit the intake of carbohydrates to under 20 grams a day. Consume foods high in protein, high in (healthy) fats, and vegetables that are low-carb.
    Balancing – Begin adding more nuts and low-carb vegetables into your diet. Small amounts of fruit may also be reintroduced.
  • Fine-tuning – Once your goal weight is reached, begin adding more carbs until weight loss slows.
  • Maintenance – You can enjoy as many carbs as you can, without gaining weight. This will vary per individual.

These phases are optional, and some people choose to skip or remain in certain phases. For example, many people remain in the induction phase, which is considered a ketogenic diet. Others will skip the induction phase, and start by introducing healthier nuts, fruits and low-carb vegetables. As long as the dietary guidelines are followed, the phases can be ignored all together, if one chooses.

Foods to avoid

Finding approved Atkins recipes online is easy, with thousands on the Atkins website alone. To help you stay on track, plan your week out in advance, or try meal prepping. Remember to avoid the following foods, and research replacements if you find yourself stuck:

  • Grains This includes wheat, rye, rice, barley and spelt.
  • Sugar Some natural sugars are fine, but any added sugars are a no-no. For example, soft drinks, cake, candy, fruit juices and more.
  • Vegetable oils Soybean oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil and canola oil. Instead, try olive oil, grapeseed oil or coconut oil.

 

The following foods should only be avoided during the induction phase of the diet, and can be enjoyed in limited quantities thereafter:

  • Starches Potatoes or sweet potatoes.
  • Legumes Chickpeas, beets, beans, lentils and more.
  • High-carb fruits and vegetables Bananas, apples, pears and grapes are just a few high-carb fruits to avoid. Vegetables include starchy vegetables, such as carrots, corn, turnips and more.

How it is different

Upon learning about the Atkins diet, many people notice that it has a number of similarities to the ketogenic diet. In fact, the induction phase of Atkins is ketosis. The primary difference between the two is that during the Keto diet, you remain in ketosis throughout the entirety of the diet. This includes not only restricting carbs, but hitting protein and fat intake goals. On Atkins, you will gradually re-introduce a healthy amount of carbs. For many followers, this makes it more practical and sustainable in the long run. With the ketogenic diet, you have to restart the entire diet over with one mishap ‒ a very discouraging setback. While both of these are effective and healthy diets, one or the other is often preferred based on a person’s eating habits.

At Solutions Weight Loss, we have a dietary solution to fit the unique needs of each one of our patients. Our team of licensed and friendly medical staff gives you the encouragement and guidance to help you stay on track or get back on track until you reach your goals. Contact us today, to get started on your weight loss journey!

What is The Mediterranean Diet and Would It Work For You?

What is The Mediterranean Diet and Would It Work For You?

Diet trends come and go faster than we can start them, but that does not hinder our curiosity. Consistently, they are chalked up to eliminating food groups or a restrictive food intake, setting us up for a mid-diet burnout or dangerous eating habits. Although some plans may achieve the desired results, they are often short-lived and lack practical healthy lifestyle choices. If you are ready to give yet another diet a go, we are happy to present our Mediterranean diet 101.

Consisting of well-balanced and relatively non-restrictive foods, the tried-and-true Mediterranean diet sets you up for a healthier, extended future. It focuses on the type of fats you eat, rather than how much. Online nutrition program, Real Living Nutrition Services, breaks down the difference between the three main fats found in our food. Along the way, you will learn about what food contains and how it has an impact on your overall health. As one of the few diets that will leave you both happy and healthy, it may be the right plan for you.

What is the Mediterranean Diet?

The Mediterranean diet encapsulates the traditional cooking style of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea in the 1960s. But why should you try the Mediterranean diet over other plans? To start, it was not developed in a lab, but evolved over 5,000 years based on a natural way of living. While the diet consists of a few basic rules, the meals created can be adapted to any local and seasonal food availability. 

 

Elena Paravantes a Greek-American Registered Dietitian, founder of OliveTomato, and Culinary Nutritionist specializing in the Mediterranean Diet, explains that, “the diet is characterized by a high intake of vegetables and olive oil, moderate amounts of carbohydrates, and small amounts of meat.”

 

Equally important, it is not just a weight loss plan, but promotes healthy living. The Mayo Clinic calls the diet “heart-healthy”, as it is associated with lower levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol, thereby reducing your chance of heart disease. It is also said to reduce the chance of diabetes, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. For these reasons, most major scientific organizations encourage healthy adults to adapt a similar diet. Notably, the base of the Mediterranean diet food pyramid consists of physical activity and interactive mealtimes. The Mediterranean lifestyle considers this aspect important, as it encourages healthy socialization.

Mediterranean Diet Meals

So what areas of your diet will change? Like the DASH Diet and Ketogenic Diet, it begins with a set calorie goal. A typical Mediterranean diet will range between 1,200 to 1,500 calories daily. This list will inform you about what you should and should not consume, as well as the recommended daily servings.

Meat and seafood The ‘bad’ cholesterol previously mentioned is due to saturated fats ‒ which are the highest in red meat. The Mediterranean diet replaces meat with plant-based foods, although red meat can be enjoyed a few times a month. Eggs and poultry are better than red meat, but only in moderation. Instead, fresh fish or seafood is recommended up to twice a week, cooked in olive or canola oil.

Fruits and vegetables – As the base of every meal, an average of nine servings of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables should be consumed every day. At least one meal a day should include a salad or other leafy greens, so get your kale on! Other fruits and vegetable servings can include olives, figs, cherries, dates, tomatoes, grapes and melons, among others.

Grains – Unlike most diets, and a relief to many, bread is a staple in every Mediterranean meal. The only stipulation is that they are whole-grain. These contain tons of vitamins, minerals and healthy fats. Other grains and pasta are also regularly featured, from five to six servings a day. Whether it is dipped, smeared, or twirled on a fork, enjoy your carbs!

Nuts and seeds A popular snack, raw nuts or seeds contain high doses of healthy fats, fiber and protein. You can have three to five one-ounce servings of raw nuts a week. The most popular are almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, pistachios, walnuts and sesame seeds. A fresh pesto or tahini is perfect for dipping whole-grain bread!

Dairy products – Approved dairy products are few and should be consumed in moderation. Try to stick to unprocessed and low-fat cheese and yogurt. For example, Greek yogurt, feta and Parmigiano-Reggiano. Other dairy products are eliminated, or can be replaced with olive oil, which is much more flavorful and rich in monounsaturated fats, omegas and antioxidants. Seven to 14 tablespoons is recommended weekly. 

Seasonings – One large hurdle for many to overcome is the use of salt. Often consumed with pastas and grains, large amounts of salt can increase your blood pressure, putting you at risk for heart attack, stroke, dementia and kidney disease. Instead, the Mediterranean diet utilizes fresh herbs and spices, which have a variety of health benefits.

Beverages If you have a hard time coping with a lack of your favorite dairy, take solace in the occasional glass of wine ‒ with your doctor’s approval. The Mediterranean diet allows up to five ounces of wine daily. Like any good diet, at least six glasses of water a day is recommended. If you want a little pick-me-up, a small unsweetened coffee or tea is fine.

Sweets Unfortunately, sweets have no place in a Mediterranean diet, including sweeteners. If you are craving something sweet, a fresh and juicy piece of fruit will keep you full. A large grapefruit, nectarine or apple can go a long way.

What is a mediterranean diet? would it work for you?

Conveniently, most Mediterranean meals require little preparation. For example, our easy Mediterranean omelet. Like all dishes, it contains the freshest ingredients and consists of a range of flavors. Many assume that Mediterranean meals are strictly Greek, but they include foods from many countries, such as Morocco, Spain and Turkey. Don’t be afraid to look further! If you have a hard time discovering dishes, Healthline offers a helpful example of a week’s worth of Mediterranean meals.

If you are still feeling uninspired, Dr. Newsome would love to assist you in your diet plan decision. Start your weight loss journey with the care and knowledge of a physician who understands the frustrations and challenges of weight loss. Contact us at Solutions Weight Loss, the preferred Orlando weight loss clinic.

Weight Loss and the DASH Diet – What You Need to Know

Weight Loss and the DASH Diet – What You Need to Know

Obesity has become an epidemic not just in the United States, but around the world. Many diet plans have been developed as a result, with varying rates of success. One diet program that is proving to be effective is DASH – Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. DASH was named as the best diet plan for the last eight years by U.S. News & World Report. Apart from hypertension (commonly known as high blood pressure), DASH is also known to fight diabetes, maintain heart health and help lower cholesterol levels.

Formulated by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the DASH diet was initially developed for people who want to take control of their hypertension. But, the diet soon gained traction among dieters, who found it helped them lose weight more effectively. As is known to most who want to lose weight, several nutritional factors that affect blood pressure also influence weight – such as sugar, trans fats and processed foods in general.

What is the DASH diet and how does it work?

The DASH diet works on the principle of cutting down on sodium consumption. You are advised to primarily focus on eating vegetables, fruits, and dairy foods. As far as dairy is concerned, you should choose low-fat options because they have less added salt. You also need to have some fish, poultry, whole grains, and nuts.

The amount of salt you should have depends on the type of DASH diet you are on:

The standard DASH diet – allowed to have up to 2,300 mg of sodium daily.

The low-sodium DASH diet – allowed to have 1,500 mg of sodium daily.

Unlike many other high-profile diet plans, DASH does not squarely focus on eliminating starches. When it comes to losing weight, sustainability is the key. Therefore, for best results, you need to follow a diet plan and continue it for a long time. But the problem when you select a low-carb diet plan is that it becomes hard for you to keep carbs at bay over the long term. However, the DASH diet is more palatable, making compliance easier.

The only restrictions in case of the DASH diet are to avoid sugar, fats, processed foods and sodium. Saying no to processed foods can solve most of your sugar, fat, and sodium problem. The ultra-processed foods an average American consumes in a day contributes 58% of the total calories, 90% of added sugars and 75% of sodium.

There is no doubt that processed foods contain excess salt, which increases the risk of diseases like hypertension, stroke, and heart disease. Cutting down the intake of salt can substantially lower these risks. But, it is not just these diseases that are linked to a high sodium diet – there is a distinct connection between high blood pressure and weight that cannot be overlooked.

What can I eat?! What does a typical DASH diet include?

One of the first questions people ask before starting a diet, is… what can I eat?!  The Dairy Alliance and Registered dietitian Sarah-Jane Bedwell combined efforts on a video detailing some menu items that qualify for the DASH Diet.

For moderately active people ages 19 to 51, DASH requires a 2,000 calorie diet per day. This is what the DASH diet menu would read like:

Grains – The ideal scenario is to consume 6-8 servings of grains every day. You should have more of whole grains because they contain nutrients and fiber in abundance. Choose products that display 100% whole grain labels.

Vegetables – Followers of the DASH diet should have 4-5 servings of vegetables every day. Add vegetables such as broccoli, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and other leafy veggies to your diet, as they are rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber.

Fruits – You should have a minimum of 4-5 servings of fruit, as it raises your energy levels and increases the fiber content in your body. You can have fruits such as apples, pears and grapefruit because these are a rich source of fiber and antioxidants.

Meat, fish, and poultry – It is always good to have meat in moderation, and that is what the DASH diet recommends. Meat contains iron, protein, B-complex vitamins and zinc. Have 4-6 servings of lean, skinless meat daily.

Dairy products – Milk and other dairy products contain protein, calcium, and vitamin D in sufficient quantity. However, select low-fat/fat-free products. You should have a minimum of 2-3 servings of dairy daily. Substitute with lactose-free dairy products if you are allergic to milk.

Oils and fats – Fats are essential for the body, as they help absorb vitamins, which helps keep the immune system in balance. Limit your fats and oil intake to 2-3 servings daily. The DASH diet recommends limiting your daily consumption of fat to under 27% and saturated fats to 7% or less.

Nuts, seeds, peas and dry beans – You should have 4-5 servings of nuts, seeds and beans every week. Nuts don’t have a good reputation because they are high in fat, but if consumed as recommended in the DASH diet, they are beneficial, as nuts are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. You can have cashews, almonds, peas, sunflower seeds, pistachio, beans, and lentils, which are rich in fiber, potassium, and magnesium.

Sweets –You can have sweets, but in moderation – keeping it to five servings a week. If you consider low-fat treats – such as jelly beans, fruit ices, granola bars and low-fat cookies – be sure to read the label for their sugar content, which can be high.

A balanced diet like DASH is planned to keep you feeling full. You have sufficient fruits and vegetables that are rich in fiber and enough lean protein that makes you feel full most of the time. DASH also reduces calorie intake, which helps you lose weight quickly. When you feel satisfied with your food intake, instead of constantly hungry, you are more likely to increase your physical activity, which also helps weight loss.

As everyone is different, it is always advisable to follow a customized diet plan. Solutions Weight Loss offers effective, proven medically supervised weight loss programs that are tailored to each individual. Dr. Newsome and our entire team provide comprehensive support to every client in reaching their goal. Contact us today to learn more.

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